Search This Blog

A Barely Adequate Guide to the Google Blogger API using Ruby

For some time now, I've been wanting to do some things with this blog that are just too tedious to do by hand. For instance, I'd like to download all posts with pictures to have a local copy, you know, just in case. Google leaves a bit to be desired in this regard with its backup feature. I would also like to get a word count of all of the posts I've written, just because I'm curious. These things would be done best with an API, so that's what this post is going to explore.

Chess Book Face Off: Best Lessons of a Chess Coach Vs. Pandolfini's Endgame Course

In my recent efforts to continue to improve at chess, I've read through a couple more books on the subject. As always, I read books in pairs so that I can get multiple perspectives on a topic and learn it more thoroughly. Sometimes the books cover nearly the same material, and other times—like in this case—the books are only loosely related. The first book is Best Lessons of a Chess Coach by Sunil Weeramantry, a FIDE Master and highly successful chess coach. This book is the kind of book that explains a handful of games in intimate detail. The second book is Pandolfini's Endgame Course by Bruce Pandolfini, a USCF National Master and a more famous highly successful chess coach. Being a book about endgames, it does not go through full games, but contains an extensive collection of endgame positions to study. So both books were written by accomplished chess masters and coaches, meaning they have at least that in common.

Best Lessons of a Chess Coach front coverVS.Pandolfini's Endgame Course front cover

Chess Book Face Off: The Development of Chess Style Vs. Chess Endings

I've been getting back into chess lately, after taking a break for a couple years, and to get back up to speed, I've been reading quite a few chess books. I thought it would be fun to review and compare some of them, which is why I explored how to add JavaScript chess boards to the blog in my last article. Now I'll put that new feature to use while discussing a couple of chess books I've read recently: The Development of Chess Style by Max Euwe and John Nunn and Chess Endings: Essential Knowledge by Yuri Averbakh. Both of these books are somewhat older, being written in 1997 and 1993, respectively. That doesn't mean they're obsolete, because plenty of good chess books are also classics. Chess as a game is still progressing and theory changes, but the fundamentals are solid. Besides, one of these books is more about the history of chess, so it's only downside to being older is that it doesn't include more current developments.

The Development of Chess Style front coverVS.Chess Endings: Essential Knowledge front cover

A Barely Adequate Guide to Displaying Chess Games with JavaScript

I've done a few of these Barely Adequate Guides in the past, the idea being that I want to explore how to do something with code that I've never done before, and I'll figure it out while writing the post so that we can all see my thought process as I go about solving the problem of getting something new up and running. This time I want to bring together two things I love doing in my free time: programming and chess. I wouldn't say I'm an especially good chess player—I'm quite mediocre actually—but I love the game, and I love learning it and reading books about it.

Tech Book Face Off: Physics of the Impossible Vs. The Physics of Star Trek

It's been a while since I've done a Tech Book Face Off. The idea here is to review a couple of books together and compare and contrast their ways of explaining something I want to learn about. Sometimes both books are good, sometimes neither, but reading at least two books on a subject is a great way to get multiple perspectives on it. We learn different things from different teachers, so more than one point of view can be invaluable for learning about something deeply. In this Tech Book Face Off, I'm going more for future tech than modern tech—future tech in the nearly (or actually) science fiction sense. We have Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel by Michio Kaku and The Physics of Star Trek by Lawrence M. Krauss to look at. Both books are as much popular physics books as they are books on technology, but they each take different approaches to exploring the ideas about the technology of the far future. They were also both a blast to read, with fascinating discussions about what could be possible and what is, as far as we know, quite impossible.

Physics of the Impossible front coverVS.The Physics of Star Trek front cover

Learning What to Know or Knowing How to Learn

As I get older, I notice more and more that I am slowly forgetting. Things I once learned in high school or college are fading from memory. Hard-fought knowledge has since gone unused and languished into oblivion. This process is not entirely a bad thing, as some of that knowledge has never been useful since the last paper was written and the final exam was finished, and more heavily-used knowledge has taken its place. Learning and then forgetting all of that knowledge was not a total loss, either, because along the way I learned something else even more valuable: how to learn efficiently.

What do I Care if Polar Bears Die?

A friend of mine asked me this recently, and I couldn't be sure if he was genuinely curious or just trolling me. I didn't give him the greatest response, something along the lines of, "That question shows a general lack of systems thinking." Then the conversation moved on to other topics. I was caught off-guard by the question because the premise that someone wouldn't care about the survival of an entire species as iconic as the polar bear is well outside my normal lines of thought. I can't stop thinking about how poorly I answered the question, so it's time to dig in and get to the bottom of the matter.

Polar bear jumping on fast ice
Credit: Arturo de Frias Marques from Wikipedia